LAVENDER FESTIVAL AT 123 FARM

Lavender Care Instructions

Did you buy a lavender plant from our farm? The plants are propagated from our organic lavender plants. Read how to care for your specific lavender variety below.

General Lavender Care Instructions

Lavender is a popular fragrant perennial plant with upright flower spikes and shaped to be a compact shrub form. It is recommended to plant lavender when the soil is warmer, after frost has passed. Lavender plants are quite hardy and resilient plants.

Planting Requirements:  Plant in Spring after danger of frost or in the Fall.  Lavenders require good drainage.  If soil is mostly clay, amending and aerating the planting area will ensure better success.  Planting in a dome is another way to promote good drainage and keep your lavender from sinking down in clay soil.  The preferred mulch at the base of the plant is gravel or a thin layer of compost.  Do not use wood or leaf mulches as this contributes to root rot.

Repotting and transplanting:  To determine your lavender is hardy and ready to repot or transplant, check the bottom of the container for vigorous roots coming out of the drainage holes.  This is a sign of good health.

Watering:  Water at base of plant only.  Lavenders do not like overhead spray.  Use of a drip system is best. Put on a drip line with plants that have similar water needs to avoid overwatering.  Lavenders rot very easily when overwatered.  To avoid this, allow the soil to dry out moderately before next watering.

Fertilizing:  Lavenders are hillside plants that thrive in rocky, good draining soil that is somewhat alkaline (pH of 6.5 to 7.5).  Lavenders do not require a great deal of fertilizer as they prefer neutral soil.  Since this is the case, use of compost or compost tea is all that is needed.

Blooming Time/Harvesting:  Medium blue flowers once in early Summer.  Harvest when flowers first pop open.
Pruning:  Lavenders can live up to 25 years if well maintained.  The time to prune is after the flush of flowers.  The flowers and stems should be gently pruned so the plant is the shape of a ball. Consider it a haircut not a severe pruning.  Removing the flowers in this manner allows the plant to regenerate foliage and avoids it from becoming “woody.”  

Diseases:  Root rot

Specific Lavender Plant Care Instructions

Click on the lavender variety below to jump to specific care instructions.

French Fields Lavender Care Instructions
Grosso Lavender Care Instructions
Sarah Lavender Care Instructions
Provence Lavender Care Instructions
Munstead Lavender Care Instructions

French Fields Lavender

Common Name:  French Fields

Botanical Name:  Lavendula angustifolia “French Fields”

Origin:  Unknown.

Height/Physical Description:  24 to 30 inches in height, 30 to 36 inches wide, stem length 8 to 10 inches, purple flowers, green leaves.

Special Attributes:  This plant blooms continuously starting in Spring, making it a beautiful choice for residential gardens.  It is said to resemble the wild lavender that grows in the Mediterranean which is how its name, “French Field,” was derived.    

Purchasing:  Check your nurseries that carry various plant varieties or order online.

Planting Requirements:  Plant in Spring after danger of frost or in the Fall.  Lavenders require good drainage.  If soil is mostly clay, amending and aerating the planting area will ensure better success.  Planting in a dome is another way to promote good drainage and keep your lavender from sinking down in clay soil.  The preferred mulch at the base of the plant is gravel or a thin layer of compost.  Do not use wood or leaf mulches as this contributes to root rot.

Repotting and transplanting:  To determine your lavender is hardy and ready to repot or transplant, check the bottom of the container for vigorous roots coming out of the drainage holes.  This is a sign of good health.

Watering:  Water at base of plant only.  Lavenders do not like overhead spray.  Use of a drip system is best.  Put on a drip line with plants that have similar water needs to avoid overwatering.  Lavenders rot very easily when overwatered.  To avoid this, allow the soil to dry out moderately before next watering.

Fertilizing:  Lavenders are hillside plants that thrive in rocky, good draining soil that is somewhat alkaline (pH of 6.5 to 7.5).  Lavenders do not require a great deal of fertilizer as they prefer neutral soil.  Since this is the case, use of compost or compost tea is all that is needed.

Blooming Time/Harvesting:  Purple flowers continuously bloom, starting in Spring. Harvest when flowers first pop open.

Pruning:  Lavenders can live up to 25 years if well maintained.  The time to prune is after the flush of flowers.  The flowers and stems should be gently pruned so the plant is the shape of a ball. Consider it a haircut not a severe pruning.  Removing the flowers in this manner allows the plant to regenerate foliage and avoids it from becoming “woody.”  If the plant has become woody, it cannot be reversed.  It will live but will not have the original full shape that it had at the beginning.Pruning underneath the plant is another way to keep the plant healthy as this promotes good air circulation which avoids root rot.

Pests:  Spittle bugs, grasshoppers, gophers, moles.

Diseases:  Root rot.

Hardiness:  zones 5-9

Additional Comments:  French Fields is a type of lavendula angustifolia.  Angustifolias are considered “true lavender” and known for being some of the most cold-hardy varieties.  Their colors seem more vibrant, flowers seem more fragrant and taste sweet.  A common name that is used for Angustifolias is “English” lavender.  This is not an accurate term especially since lavenders are grown worldwide.  The best way to identify a lavender or any plant in general is by using its botanical name.

Grosso Lavender

Common Name:  Grosso

Botanical Name:  Lavandula x intermedia, “Grosso.”  The “intermedia” lavender varieties are cross breeds.  This means they are a cross between two varieties of lavenders:  L. angustifolia and L. latifolia.  Intermedias are also known as “lavandins”.  These plants tend to grow larger, produce numerous long flower stems, have a high oil content and are hardy.

Origin:  Vaucluse District, France, approximately 1972, by Pierre Grosso

Height/Physical Description:  32-36 inches in height, 36 inches wide, gray-green leaves, purple flowers.  The flower stem length spans 20-24 inches.  Plant grows in a 180-degree dome shape.

Special Attributes:  The flowers are very fragrant, have a high oil content and it is an excellent variety to use for distilling essential oil.  It is both cold and heat hardy which makes it a perfect choice for arid Southern California farms and gardens.    

Purchasing:  Easy to find at local nurseries as it is hardy and grows quickly.

Planting Requirements:  Plant in Spring after danger of frost or in the Fall.  Lavenders require good drainage.  If soil is mostly clay, amending and aerating the planting area will ensure better success.  Planting in a dome is another way to promote good drainage and keep your lavender from sinking down in clay soil.  The preferred mulch at the base of the plant is gravel or a thin layer of compost.  Do not use wood or leaf mulches as this contributes to root rot.

Repotting and transplanting:  To determine your lavender is hardy and ready to repot or transplant, check the bottom of the container for vigorous roots coming out of the drainage holes.  This is a sign of good health.

Watering:  Water at base of plant only.  Lavenders do not like overhead spray.  Use of a drip system is best.  Put on a drip line with plants that have similar water needs to avoid overwatering.  Lavenders rot very easily when overwatered.  To avoid this, allow the soil to dry out moderately before next watering.

Fertilizing:  Lavenders are hillside plants that thrive in rocky, good draining soil that is somewhat alkaline (pH of 6.5 to 7.5).  Lavenders do not require a great deal of fertilizer as they prefer neutral soil.  Since this is the case, use of compost or compost tea is all that is needed.

Blooming Time/Harvesting:  Purple flowers once in early Summer.  Harvest when flowers first pop open.

Pruning:  Lavenders can live up to 25 years if well maintained.  The time to prune is after the flush of flowers.  The flowers and stems should be gently pruned so the plant is the shape of a ball. Consider it a haircut not a severe pruning.  Removing the flowers in this manner allows the plant to regenerate foliage and avoids it from becoming “woody.”  

Note:  If the plant has become woody, it cannot be reversed.  It will live but will not have the original full shape that it had at the beginning.Pruning underneath the plant is another way to keep the plant healthy as this promotes good air circulation which avoids root rot.

Pests:  Spittle bugs, grasshoppers, gophers, moles.

Diseases:  Root rot.

Hardiness:  zones 5-9 Fields

Sarah Lavender

Common Name:  Sarah

Botanical Name:  Lavendula angustifolia “Sarah”

Origin:  California, late 1980’s.

Height/Physical Description:  20 to 24 inches in height, 20 to 30 inches wide, stem length 6 to 8 inches, medium purple flowers, green leaves.

Special Attributes:  This plant blooms twice yearly starting in Spring providing early color in the landscape.  The compact size is very manageable for residential gardens.    

Purchasing:  Check your nurseries that carry various plant varieties or order online.

Planting Requirements:  Plant in Spring after danger of frost or in the Fall.  Lavenders require good drainage.  If soil is mostly clay, amending and aerating the planting area will ensure better success.  Planting in a dome is another way to promote good drainage and keep your lavender from sinking down in clay soil.  The preferred mulch at the base of the plant is gravel or a thin layer of compost.  Do not use wood or leaf mulches as this contributes to root rot.

Repotting and transplanting:  To determine your lavender is hardy and ready to repot or transplant, check the bottom of the container for vigorous roots coming out of the drainage holes.  This is a sign of good health.

Watering:  Water at base of plant only.  Lavenders do not like overhead spray.  Use of a drip system is best. Put on a drip line with plants that have similar water needs to avoid overwatering.  Lavenders rot very easily when overwatered.  To avoid this, allow the soil to dry out moderately before the next watering.  

Fertilizing:  Lavenders are hillside plants that thrive in rocky, good draining soil that is somewhat alkaline (pH of 6.5 to 7.5).  Lavenders do not require a great deal of fertilizer as they prefer neutral soil.  Since this is the case, use of compost or compost tea is all that is needed.

Blooming Time/Harvesting:  medium purple flowers bloom twice yearly starting in Spring. Harvest when flowers first pop open.

Pruning:  Lavenders can live up to 25 years if well maintained.  The time to prune is after the flush of flowers.  The flowers and stems should be gently pruned so the plant is the shape of a ball. Consider it a haircut not a severe pruning.  Removing the flowers in this manner allows the plant to regenerate foliage and avoids it from becoming “woody.”  

‍‍Note:  If the plant has become woody, it cannot be reversed.  It will live but will not have the original full shape that it had at the beginning.Pruning underneath the plant is another way to keep the plant healthy as this promotes good air circulation which avoids root rot.

Pests:  Spittle bugs, grasshoppers, gophers, moles.

Diseases:  Root rot.

Hardiness:  zones 6-9Additional Comments:  Sarah is a type of lavendula angustifolia.  Angustifolias are considered “true lavender” and known for being some of the most cold-hardy varieties.  Their colors seem more vibrant, flowers seem more fragrant and taste sweet.  A common name that is used for Angustifolias is “English” lavender.  This is not an accurate term especially since lavenders are grown worldwide.  The best way to identify a lavender or any plant in general is by using its botanical name.

Provence Lavender

Common Name:  Provence

Botanical Name:  Lavandula x intermedia, “Provence.”  The “intermedia” lavender varieties are cross breeds.  This means they are a cross between two varieties of lavenders:  L. angustifolia and L. latifolia.  Intermedias are also known as “lavandins”.  These plants tend to grow larger, produce numerous long flower stems, have a high oil content and are hardy.

Origin:  Alpenglow Gardens, North Surrey, British Columbia, mid-1950’s.

Height/Physical Description:  48 to 60 inches in height, 60 to 72 inches wide, green leaves, light purple flowers.  The flower stem length spans 24 to 30 inches.

Special Attributes:  The flowers are very fragrant, has a high oil content and is an excellent variety to use for distilling essential oil.  The flower buds are sweet and good to use for culinary purposes.  It is both cold and heat hardy which makes it a perfect choice for arid Southern California farms and gardens.    

Purchasing:  Easy to find at local nurseries as it is hardy and grows quickly.

Planting Requirements:  Plant in Spring after danger of frost or in the Fall.  Lavenders require good drainage.  If soil is mostly clay, amending and aerating the planting area will ensure better success. Planting in a dome is another way to promote good drainage and keep your lavender from sinking down in clay soil.  The preferred mulch at the base of the plant is gravel or a thin layer of compost.  Do not use wood or leaf mulches as this contributes to root rot.

Repotting and transplanting:  To determine your lavender is hardy and ready to repot or transplant, check the bottom of the container for vigorous roots coming out of the drainage holes.  This is a sign of good health.

Watering:  Water at base of plant only.  Lavenders do not like overhead spray.  Use of a drip system is best.  Put on a drip line with plants that have similar water needs to avoid overwatering.  Lavenders rot very easily when overwatered.  To avoid this, allow the soil to dry out moderately before watering next.  

Fertilizing:  Lavenders are hillside plants that thrive in rocky, good draining soil that is somewhat alkaline (pH of 6.5 to 7.5).  Lavenders do not require a great deal of fertilizer as they prefer neutral soil.  Since this is the case, use of compost or compost tea is all that is needed.

Blooming Time/Harvesting:  Light purple flowers once in early summer.  Harvest when flowers first pop open.

Pruning:  Lavenders can live up to 25 years if well maintained.  The time to prune is after the flush of flowers.  The flowers and stems should be gently pruned so the plant is the shape of a ball. Consider it a haircut not a severe pruning  Removing the flowers in this manner allows the plant to regenerate foliage and avoids it from becoming “woody.”  

Note:  If the plant has become woody, it cannot be reversed.  It will live but will not have the original full shape that it had at the beginning.Pruning underneath the plant is another way to keep the plant healthy as this promotes good air circulation which avoids root rot.

Pests:  Spittle bugs, grasshoppers, gophers, moles.

Diseases:  Root rot.

Hardiness:  zones 5-9.  Provence thrives in dry summer climates.  In wetter climates, this lavender is more prone to root rot.

Additional Comments: When considering Provence for a residential garden, be sure to allow plenty of room as it is a very large plant.

Munstead Lavender

Common Name:  Munstead

Botanical Name:  Lavendula angustifolia “Munstead”

Origin:  Gertrude Jekyll, Munstead Wood, West Surrey, England, 1902.

Height/Physical Description:  20 to 24 inches in height, 24 to 30 inches wide, stem length 6 to 8 inches, medium purple flowers, gray-green leaves.

Special Attributes:  This variety blooms more than once during the year, starting in Spring.  The plant size is easy to manage in residential gardens.    

Purchasing:  Easy to find in local nurseries.

Planting Requirements:  Plant in Spring after danger of frost or in the Fall.  Lavenders require good drainage.  If soil is mostly clay, amending and aerating the planting area will ensure better success. Planting in a dome is another way to promote good drainage and keep your lavender from sinking down in clay soil. The preferred mulch at the base of the plant is gravel or a thin layer of compost.  Do not use wood or leaf mulches as this contributes to root rot.

Repotting and transplanting:  To determine your lavender is hardy and ready to repot or transplant, check the bottom of the container for vigorous roots coming out of the drainage holes.  This is a sign of good health.

Watering:  Water at base of plant only.  Lavenders do not like overhead spray.  Use of a drip system is best. Put on a drip line with plants that have similar water needs to avoid overwatering.  Lavenders rot very easily when overwatered.  To avoid this, allow the soil to dry out moderately before next watering.

Fertilizing:  Lavenders are hillside plants that thrive in rocky, good draining soil that is somewhat alkaline (pH of 6.5 to 7.5).  Lavenders do not require a great deal of fertilizer as they prefer neutral soil.  Since this is the case, use of compost or compost tea is all that is needed.

Blooming Time/Harvesting:  Medium purple flowers twice a year, starting in Spring. Harvest when flowers first pop open.

Pruning:  Lavenders can live up to 25 years if well maintained.  The time to prune is after the flush of flowers.  The flowers and stems should be gently pruned so the plant is the shape of a ball. Consider it a haircut not a severe pruning.  Removing the flowers in this manner allows the plant to regenerate foliage and avoids it from becoming “woody.”  ‍

Note:  If the plant has become woody, it cannot be reversed.  It will live but will not have the original full shape that it had at the beginning.Pruning underneath the plant is another way to keep the plant healthy as this promotes good air circulation which avoids root rot.

Pests:  Spittle bugs, grasshoppers, gophers, moles.

Diseases:  Root rot.

Hardiness:  zones 5-9Additional Comments:  Munstead is a type of lavendula angustifolia.  Angustifolias are considered “true lavender” and known for being some of the most cold-hardy varieties.  Their colors seem more vibrant, flowers seem more fragrant and taste sweet.  A common name that is used for Angustifolias is “English” lavender.  This is not an accurate term especially since lavenders are grown worldwide.  The best way to identify a lavender or any plant in general is by using its botanical name.